The Amazing DivX Converter

If you’ve used DivX Converter, you know how easy it is to drag a video on to the converter, pick a profile and click “Start”. Boom. Just like that, you’ve converted a video. It’s simple to use … even for me.

Simply drag, drop and convertSimply drag, drop and convert with DivX Converter.

So you know that it’s easy to convert video (or you do now), but maybe you don’t know about some of the “advanced features” of DivX Converter. Below we’ll take a quick look at some of benefits of using the features included with DivX Pro.

First, why convert videos in the first place?

While there are many reasons why you may need to convert a video, some of the more popular reasons include:

  • Creating a smaller file size: By using the technology included in DivX Converter, you can compress your video file size without losing any significant quality.
  • Making the file compatible with another device: Say you have .wmv file you want to play on your iPhone or iPad. Just convert it with the preset profile for your device to create a compatible .mp4 file.
  • Ensure your file plays through DivX Mobile: If you use the free DivX Mobile app for Android or iOS, you can convert a non-compatible file to a DivX Plus HD (.mkv) file to play on your phone or cast to your TV or media streamer (e.g. Roku, Chromecast, Apple TV, Fire TV, Xbox, etc.).
  • Back up DVDs: With DivX Pro and the included MPEG-2 Plug-in, you can convert non-encrypted DVDs so you can have a digital backup of your personal video collection.

ADVANCED FEATURES IN DIVX CONVERTER
There are several features only available with DivX Pro that give you even more value from DivX Converter.

  • Trim video: Have a video with some wasted time in the beginning and/or end? Using this feature allows you to choose a starting and end point before you begin your conversion. When your file is done, it will be converted to the profile you chose, plus at the length you specified. Learn more about trimming your video.
  • Crop, rotate/flip: Filmed a video sideways? No problem. Just rotate the video until it’s correct. Or crop the borders of your video to center your subject, for example.
  • Add a custom watermark: Want to put your brand on your videos? Simply upload a logo/image, choose the level of transparency and you’re good to go.

Trimming a video in DivX Converter
Trimming a video in DivX Converter

 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

 

The Goods Under the Hood

Some of the most exciting things we get to do at DivX are found “under the hood”—tweaks and technology that you don’t necessarily see but that are essential to a high-quality DivX video experience.

One of these things is hardware acceleration, which has several benefits to computer resources and functionality, especially when it comes to high-resolution video.

So, what is hardware acceleration?

Ever tried playing back HD or 4K video on your computer and notice issues? Media players may struggle with larger, higher resolution files like HD or 4K when playback is done through the software using CPU, eating up valuable system resources. This can result in playback issues like noise, stuttering or frames being dropped.

With hardware acceleration, the GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) is used to offload some of the processing effort from the more general-purpose CPU. The result? Heavy-process tasks like playing HD or 4K video is handled with ease so you can sit back and enjoy the quality or multi-task.

What’s the benefit in DivX Software?

DivX Software uses hardware acceleration to encode and decode both ASP (DIVX/AVI) and AVC (H.264/MKV) video content on a variety of popular systems.

The latest versions of DivX Player and DivX Web Player offload the heavy lifting to GPUs through a video decoding specification called DirectX Video Acceleration (DXVA)—yep, even for 4K videos!

We’ve done some preliminary tests of playback with and without hardware acceleration—same system, same video but very different results. Here we tested 4K AVC and HEVC clips on Intel Core Broadwell 2GB Windows 8.1-based device.

CPU Utilization with hardware acceleration

Battery life with hardware acceleration

Note: CPU utilization with software decoding is the same for AVC and HEVC.
Hardware decoding results apply to AVC clips only. 
Results may vary depending on device and system configuration.

So basically, you can watch an entire extra TV episode and still have time for a snack break on the same battery if you’re using hardware decoding.

If you have a system that supports hardware decoding in our software and want to compare this yourself, you can try it out by downloading some sample clips below. We used 4K raw MP4 files as sources and did a combination of 4K and 1080p encodes in h.264/MKV format with a few different bitrate settings.

That gives you an idea of the benefits of using the GPU to decode your videos. You can turn hardware decoding on/off in DivX Player by going to the player’s advanced preferences:

disable hardware decoding in DivX Player

 

DivX Converter uses hardware acceleration for encoding as well. When your system is able to make use of GPU for your encoding, you’ll see the DivX Accelerated logo appear like this:

Hardware acceleration to convert MKV DivX AVI MP4

 

Not only will this make conversion more efficient, but battery life and multitasking ability is improved like during playback.

Regardless of your interest in GPUs and CPUs, there’s great technology working behind the scenes to help DivX provide a great video experience. The next time you have a high resolution file you want to play or convert in H.264 or DIVX/AVI format, make sure hardware acceleration is enabled if your system is supported. It will make a big difference in playing or converting those high-quality videos!